Age of Identity Politics in the U.S.A.

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In his March 26 op-ed for The Washington Post, George F. Will raises an important and often overlooked issue, that of sacrifice of excellence due to identity politics. During many ages of United States history, identity politics had been a prevalent force, as seen in the enslavement of kidnapped Africans, discrimination against women and African Americans in voting rights, internment of Japanese Americans, segregation of races, and redlining, among other issues. As these issues are slowly being addressed, Will argues that many other areas of American life are falling prey to identity politics.

In particular, Will sheds light on an issue within the education system, where excellence and merit are being sacrificed in the name of identity politics. He points out that an esteemed educational institution such as The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) should be setting a positive example by sticking to their own high standards of excellence, instead of indulging in identity politics. Will’s article raises a crucial point that excellence should be the primary focus within educational institutions, as this is the foundation for our future generations and advancing our civilization.

George Will is a highly acclaimed columnist for The Washington Post and Newsweek, currently served as Edwark R Murrow professor of media and politics at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Additionally, he is a political commentator for Fox News, as well as an author of many books. In 2020, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Donald Trump, the highest honor in the United States. Throughout his career, George Will has been a strong advocate for merit-based excellence over identity politics.

MIT is one of the most distinguished and storied educational institutions in the United States, ranking numerous times among the best schools in the world. MIT boasts a highly accomplished and targeted selection process, awarding admission to only the highest and brightest students across the globe. In recent years, the school has come under scrutiny for its alleged acceptance of students based on identity politics rather than merit or excellence. Will argues that MIT should keep its commitment to excellence and not give in to identity politics.